Full transcript of the lesson:

PhraseAudioSpeaker
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Welcome to the Wikiotics conversational English lessons.
Teacher
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In this lesson we learn to introduce people and how to refer to them by gender.
Teacher
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This lesson will be easiest to understand if you have already listened to the first lesson in the "Introductions" topic and the "Talking about language studies" topic.
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Listen to the following dialogue between Ed and Pam, two English students at a local gathering of students meeting to practice their English. When it is complete we will examine each part individually.
Teacher
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"Hi Pam."
Ed
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"Hi Ed."
Pam
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"Have you met Harold? He is a language student."
Ed
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"Hello Harold, my name is Pam."
Pam
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"Hello Pam. Nice to meet you."
Harold
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"Nice to meet you too."
Pam
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"Have you met Naomi? She is a language student too."
Pam
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"Hello Naomi. Nice to meet you."
Ed
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"Nice to meet you too."
Naomi
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Here we have Ed and Pam, who we met in the first indroduction lesson, introducing each other to their friends. Let's look at each part of the conversation one at a time.
Teacher
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When Ed and Pam greet each other at the beginning of the dialogue, they use a different greeting from the one in our first lesson.
Teacher
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Do you remember the greeting we learned last lesson? Say it to yourself.
Teacher
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<pause>
<pause>
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"Hello."
Ed
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"Hello" is a general purpose greeting. Now that Ed and Pam know each other a little better, they use the more informal version of "Hello". Let's hear that version:
Teacher
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"Hi."
Ed
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And from Pam:
Teacher
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"Hi."
Pam
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"Hello" and "Hi" are interchangable in all but the most formal situations but "Hi" is somewhat more common between friends and acquaintances.
Teacher
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Once Pam and Ed greet each other they begin introducing Harold and Naomi. First Ed asks Pam:
Teacher
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"Have you met Harold?"
Ed
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"Have you met Harold?"
Ed
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This means 'have you met Harold?' and is the normal question to ask before introducing two people. Try repeating it to yourself.
Teacher
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<pause>
<pause>
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This question is a "Yes" or "No" question, just like the question from our "Talking about language studies" lesson asking if you are a langauge student. Do you remember how to ask that?
Teacher
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<pause>
<pause>
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"Are you a language student?"
Pam
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Harold actually is a language student, which Ed tells us by saying:
Teacher
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"He is a language student."
Ed
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"He is a language student."
Ed
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Now we learn a third word for refering to people:
Teacher
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"He"
Ed
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In the second lesson we learned "I" to refer to yourself, and "You" to refer to the person you are talking to.
Teacher
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The word "He" is used when talking about someone other than the person you are talking to directly.
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Unlike "I" and "You", which can refer to people of any gender, "He" should only be used to refer to males.
Teacher
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Let's listen to Ed's introduction all together.
Teacher
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"Have you met Harold? He is a language student."
Ed
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Pam replies:
Teacher
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"Hello Harold, my name is Pam."
Pam
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"Hello Harold, my name is Pam."
Pam
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All of this we covered in the first lesson.
Teacher
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Harold replies:
Teacher
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"Hello Pam. Nice to meet you.'
Harold
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And then Pam concludes:
Teacher
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"Nice to meet you too."
Pam
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Remember to use the word "too" when you are responding to someone who has already said "Nice to meet you". That way you indicate that you have heard them and share their sentiment.
Teacher
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The second half of the dialogue is very similar but this time Pam is introducing Ed to her friend Naomi.
Teacher
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Pam begins:
Teacher
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"Have you met Naomi? She is a language student too."
Pam
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"Have you met Naomi? She is a language student
Pam
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Because Naomi and Harold are both language students, they are introduced in similar ways with two main differences.
Teacher
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The first is that Pam added "too" to her description of Naomi as a language student to acknowledge that Harold has also just been introduced as a language student.
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The second difference is the gender specific term used to refer to Naomi.
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Do you remember the term used for Harold?
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<pause>
<pause>
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"He"
Ed
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And did you catch the term used for Naomi?
Teacher
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<pause>
<pause>
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"She"
Pam
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"She"
Pam
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Like "He", "She" is a gendered term and should only be used to refer to females.
Teacher
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Let's listen to Pam introduce Naomi again.
Teacher
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"Have you met Naomi? She is a language student too."
Pam
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Ed replies:
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"Hello Naomi. Nice to meet you."
Ed
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Finally, Naomi ends the introductions by replying:
Teacher
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"Nice to meet you too."
Naomi
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Let's listen to the whole exchange again. See how much you have learned.
Teacher
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"Hi Pam."
Ed
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"Hi Ed."
Pam
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"Have you met Harold? He is a language student."
Ed
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"Hello Harold, my name is Pam."
Pam
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"Hello Pam. Nice to meet you."
Harold
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"Nice to meet you too."
Pam
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"Have you met Naomi? She is a language student too."
Pam
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"Hello Naomi. Nice to meet you."
Ed
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"Nice to meet you too."
Naomi
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Let's review some of the new material.
Teacher
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If you wanted to greet someone who you are on familiar terms with, what new word did we learn?
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<pause>
<pause>
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"Hi."
Pam
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What if you want to tell someone that your male friend is a language student, how would you describe him?
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<pause>
<pause>
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"He is a language student."
Ed
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What if your language student friend is female, how would you describe her?
Teacher
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<pause>
<pause>
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"She is a language student."
Pam
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And finally, how would you respond to this if you agree?
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"Nice to meet you."
Harold
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<pause>
<pause>
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"Nice to meet you too."
Pam
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If you know all the answers to those questions, congradulations! You are on your way to mastering English conversation in a group. If you want more practice, consider re-listening to the first leson in Introductions or in "Talking about language studies".
Teacher
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This is the end of this lesson in the Wikiotics conversational English series. For more lessons and resources, visit us at wikiotics.org.
Teacher
Tags:
  • LLT
  • target-language:en
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