Full transcript of the lesson:

phraseaudiolanguagespeaker
1
Like in english, the numbers 11 and 12 have irregular forms.
en
2
Numbers higher than 12 then follow more regular and easier rules.
en
3
Let's start by listening to 11 to 20 in order.
en
4
11 - elf
de
5
Watch out for those dots! They turn a vowel into an "Umlaut", which sounds a bit weird to ears not used to it. Make an effort to copy it from the speech announcement (soon to follow), as for ears used to it, it sounds weird when it's missing.
en
6
12 - zwölf
de
7
13 - dreizehn
de
8
14 - vierzehn
de
9
Another "Umlaut"! This time, turning a "U" into an "ü". Please also see the special "German Umlaut" section (under construction).
en
10
15 - fünfzehn
de
11
The "ch" is often pronounced differently depending on its place in the word, but luckily also depending on its place throughout Germany - so don't mind too much if you don't get the special soft sound here from the start.
en
12
16 - sechzehn
de
13
17 - siebzehn
de
14
Hear (soon) how the "ch" turns around and comes from being very tender to being very harsh?
en
15
18 - achtzehn
de
16
19 - neunzehn
de
17
20 - zwanzig
de
18
Do you remember how to say 12?
en
19
zwölf
de
20
Can you repeat 15?
en
21
fünfzehn
de
22
What's the word for 11?
en
23
elf
de
24
Say 20 again.
en
25
zwanzig
de
26
How do you say 18?
en
27
achtzehn
de
28
Say 16.
en
29
sechzehn
de
Tags:
  • source-language:en
  • target-language:de
  • wikibabel
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